Passing the Peace

Passing or sharing the “Peace of Christ” is a common element in Christian worship.  What words feel comfortable for your congregation?  Here are some variations on the theme…

 

 

 

Sharing ‘The Peace’
God makes peace within us.  Let us claim it.
God makes peace between us.  Let us share it (nwi).
Let us greet another as a sign of God’s peace.

The peace of God is here… to stay. (Iona)
All        Thanks be to God.
You are invited to share the peace with your neighbours.

From the Pentecost Service, “Gathering for the Celebration of Life” (24 May 2015, Pentecost B) by Revd Rex A E Hunt, Progressive preacher, liturgist and activist, Australia


We greet one another as a sign of God’s peace and Christ’s friendship by saying, ‘Christ’s peace be with you.’ And we respond with, ‘And also with you.’

From the service sheet on the Fifth Sunday of Lent at Garden Street United Methodist Church, Bellingham, Washington USA, 25 March 2012


Unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given, and his name shall be called the Prince of Peace.

[Peace]* be always with you.

And also with you.

Members of the congregation may greet each other with a sign of peace, most commonly a handshake.

 

*original text: The peace of the Lord

From the service sheet for the Sung Eucharist at Westminster Abbey, London UK, on the First Sunday of Christmas, 30 December 2012. Seemingly taken from Common Worship (Church House Publishing 2000)


Jesus said, “Peace I leave with you,

A peace the world cannot give.”

[Peace]* be always with you.

And also with you.

Let us offer one another a sign of peace.

People greet each other saying “Peace be with you.”

 

*original text: The peace of the Lord

From the service sheet for “A Celebration for Ascension Day” at St Martin-in-the-Fields, London, Thursday 14 May 2015


Sharing the Peace

In Jesus Christ, we know God’s forgiveness and peace. Let us share that peace with one another.

(“The peace of Christ be with you.” “And also with you.”)

From the service “In the Beginning: Genesis in Scripture, Prayer and Song,” found on Carolyn Winfrey Gillette’s website.